Use Open Source FlashDevelop IDE with Google Maps API for Flash

by James Richards September 30, 2009

This thread on the Google Maps API for Flash Group Forum caught my attention yesterday:

The author outlines the steps required to get FlashDevelop up and running with the Google Maps API for Flash. FlashDevelop is a free and open source IDE with code completion for ActionScript, MXML, XML, and HTML.

image

It provides a compelling alternative to FlexBuilder and is worth a look. Please donate to the project if you use it!

I followed the steps outlined in the thread and everything worked as described. Here are a few extra details that might be useful:

Hope this helps!

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ActionScript | Flex 3 | Google Maps | Planet GS

Implementing Model-View-ViewModel with the Bing Maps (Virtual Earth) Silverlight Map Control

by James Richards September 28, 2009

Overview

I’ve been looking at the Bing Maps (Virtual Earth) Silverlight Map Control and thinking about how to use it in a Silverlight application that implements the Model-View-ViewModel pattern. If you’re not familiar with this pattern, check out Shawn Wildermuth’s MSDN Article Model-View-ViewModel in Silverlight 2 Apps.

I’ve created a simple proof of concept application that implements the pattern with two Views: a Map based View and a Data Grid based View. The application displays a map of well known surf spots in the Los Angeles area, along with some basic information about each spot in an accompanying data grid.

image

[more]

There is no live example posted for this one, as Microsoft has not yet released the Silverlight Map Control with a “Go Live” license. But you can download source code from here to try it out on your own system.

Synchronizing Multiple Views with the ViewModel

Both Views work off the same ViewModel and stay synchronized via events that the ViewModel fires back to the Views after user gestures.

image

There are two main types of user gestures where this comes into play:

  1. When the map is first loaded or the user pan/zooms the map, the ViewModel is notified of the new map extent. The ViewModel then loads surf spots that fall within the new Map Extent from a Repository. An event is fired back to both Views and they update themselves to display only the surf spots that were loaded based on the new map extent.
  2. When a user clicks on a surf spot in either the map or the list, the ViewModel is notified of the newly selected surf spot. An event is fired back to both views and they update themselves to display the selected spot. 

In the next section, I’ll take a closer look at the first example.

Loading Surf Spots from the Repository

The xaml file for the SurfSpotsMapView markup contains just a Map with a specified ViewChangeStart event.

SurfSpotsMapView.xaml

<UserControl x:Class="Map.Client.Views.SurfSpotsMapView"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008"
    xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006"
    xmlns:m="clr-namespace:Microsoft.VirtualEarth.MapControl;assembly=Microsoft.VirtualEarth.MapControl"
    mc:Ignorable="d"
    d:DesignWidth="500"
    d:DesignHeight="500">
    <Grid x:Name="LayoutRoot" Background="White">
        <m:Map Name="Map1" ViewChangeStart="Map_ViewChangeStart">          
        </m:Map>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

The ViewChangeStart event fires whenever the map extent is about to change. This event generally coincides with the beginning of the animation to the new map extent. This provides an excellent opportunity to start loading the surf spots while the map is doing its animation thing.

private void Map_ViewChangeStart(object sender, MapEventArgs e)
{
    MapViewSpecification mvs = Map1.TargetView;
    LocationRect bounds = Map1.GetBoundingRectangle(mvs);
    viewModel.LoadSurfSpots(bounds.North, bounds.West, bounds.South, bounds.East);
}

In the Map_ViewChangeStart event, the map’s TargetView property contains the MapViewSpecification of the map extent that the map will be animating (panning or zooming) towards. The method examines the bounding rectangle of the target MapViewSpecification and asks the SurfSpotsViewModel to load the surf spots within that map extent via the LoadSurfSpots method.

Notice that the method just asks the ViewModel to load the surf spots, but it doesn’t expect an immediate response. Later, when the ViewModel has finished loading the data, it fires off an event telling both Views to refresh themselves with the new data. This allows for data to be loaded asynchronously, typically from a remote web service.

The SurfSpotsMapView class has a ViewModel property setter where we wire up the events that are expected to be fired from the ViewModel. This is called when the View is first created:

public SurfSpotsViewModel ViewModel
{
    get { return viewModel; }
    set
    {
        viewModel = value;

        // Wire up the View Model
        viewModel.SurfSpotsLoaded += new EventHandler(SurfSpotsLoadedHandler);
        viewModel.SurfSpotsLoadError += new EventHandler(SurfSpotsLoadErrorHandler);
        viewModel.SelectedSurfSpotChanged += new EventHandler(SelectedSurfSpotChangedHandler);
    }
}

Like the ViewModel, the repository is also asynchronous in nature and the ViewModel’s LoadSurfSpots method simply delegates to an analogous method on the repository. Consider the following ISurfSpotsRespository interface:

public interface ISurfSpotRepository
{
    // Load all surf spots
    void LoadSurfSpots();

    // Load surf spots within the specified extent
    void LoadSurfSpots(double north, double west, double south, double east);

    // Event to fire when surf spots have been loaded
    event EventHandler<SurfSpotEventArgs> SurfSpotLoadingComplete;

    // Event to fire when there is an error loading surf spots
    event EventHandler<SurfSpotErrorEventArgs> SurfSpotLoadingError;
}

When the repository has finished loading the data, it fires the SurfSpotLoadingComplete event back to the ViewModel, which in turn fires its own event back to any listening Views.

To keep the example simple, ISurfSpotRespository is implemented as a mock in-memory repository called InMemorySurfSpotRepository. See the sample code download for the complete implementation. Note that a real web application would most likely load the data from a remote web service. See Johannes Kebeck’s Blog Post Database Connections with the Virtual Earth Silverlight MapControl CTP for a good example of how to do that.

Once the data loading is complete, the SurfSpotsLoadedHandler method of the SurfSpotsMapView class handles adding the new surf spots to the map:

private void SurfSpotsLoadedHandler(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    surfSpotsLayer.RemoveAllChildren();
    foreach (SurfSpot s in viewModel.SurfSpots)
    {
        Ellipse point = new Ellipse()
        {
            Width = 10,
            Height = 10,
            Fill = new SolidColorBrush(Colors.Red),
            Opacity = 0.65,
            Tag = s
        };
        point.MouseLeftButtonDown += new MouseButtonEventHandler(
            SurfSpotPoint_MouseLeftButtonDown);
        MapLayer.SetMapPosition(point, new Location(s.Latitude, s.Longitude));
        ToolTipService.SetToolTip(point, s.Name);
        surfSpotsLayer.Children.Add(point);
    }
}

In the SurfSpotsListView, keeping the list updated is even easier. The SurfSpots property of the ViewModel is an ObservableCollection<SurfSpot>, so we just need to set the ItemsSource property of inner DataGrid and it will keep itself updated automatically. This happens in the ViewModel property setter for the SurfSpotsListView:

public SurfSpotsViewModel ViewModel
{
    get { return viewModel; }
    set
    {
        viewModel = value;

        // Wire up the View Model
        viewModel.SelectedSurfSpotChanged += new EventHandler(SelectedSurfSpotChangedHandler);
        viewModel.SurfSpotsLoaded += new EventHandler(SurfSpotsLoaded);
        viewModel.SurfSpotsLoadError += new EventHandler(SurfSpotsLoadErrorHandler);

        // Set the items source for the data grid. Since it is an
        // ObservableCollection<> we don't need to handle the SurfSpotsLoaded
        // event. The grid view will automatically keep itself updated.
        DataGrid1.ItemsSource = viewModel.SurfSpots;
    }
}

Unit Tests

Of course, one of the main reasons for using the Model-View-ViewModel pattern is testability. I’ve included a simple unit test of the View Model class in the Tests project to illustrate the concept. This test is modeled after the tests found in Shawn Wildermuth’s sample code. I didn’t create a full array of tests, as it wasn’t necessary for the proof of concept. I’ll leave that as an exercise for the reader.

Wrap Up

This post has presented a proof of concept sample application using the Model-View-ViewModel pattern with the Microsoft Bing Maps (Virtual Earth) Silverlight Map Control CTP. ViewModel synchronization with multiple Views is demonstrated in the sample. While we covered some of the implementation details in this post, there is more to be found in the downloadable sample – so be sure to check it out!

If you would be interested in a follow up post covering some of the additional implementation details, please let me know in the comments.

Hope this helps!

Resources

How To Create an ArcSDE Spatial View With an Outer Join

by James Richards July 16, 2009

Overview

ArcSDE Spatial Views are a useful tool for organizing information from multiple feature classes and geodatabase tables into a single “virtual feature class” or table at the database level. Similar to a database view, they allow administrators to join commonly used information so that the users do not need to perform the same actions repeatedly in a client (in this case, ArcMap).

Spatial Views are created with the “sdetable –o create_view …” command. When creating a Spatial View in this manner, the default join type is INNER JOIN. This fact cannot be altered via the command line syntax. INNER JOIN is the most restrictive join type and only records that match on both sides of the join will be in the resulting view. But once a default INNER JOIN Spatial View has been created, the join type can be changed after the fact either with the ALTER VIEW SQL statement, or through a database administration tool.

This article demonstrates how to create a Spatial View and then change the join type using SQL Server Management Studio. The same principles can be applied to other databases using whatever management tool you have available. [more]

Discussion

Step 1: Create the Spatial View

To create the Spatial View, use the sdetable –o create_view command. The syntax for this command is:

sdetable -o create_view -T <view_name> -t <table1,table2...tablen>
-c <table_col1,table_col2...table_coln>
[-a <view_col1,view_col2...view_coln>] [-w <"where_clause">]
[-i <service>] [-s <server_name>] [-D <database>]
-u <DB_User_name> [-p <DB_User_password>] [-N] [-q]

The important parameters that we will be working with in this example are:

  • -T : The name of the view to create
  • -t : The list of tables to include in the view
  • -c : The list of columns to include in the view
  • -a : The list of field alias as they will appear in the view
  • -w : A where clause to define the view
  • -u : The name of a user with ArcSDE administration privileges
  • -p : The password for the aforementioned user

Here’s an example that joins a geodatabase table to a feature class on a common ID field called Join_ID:

sdetable –o create_view –T MyView –t “MyLayer, MyTable”
-c “MyLayer.OBJECTID, MyLayer.Shape, MyLayer.Join_ID, MyTable.Join_ID, MyTable.Field1”
-a “OBJECTID, Shape, Layer_Join_ID, Table_Join_ID, Table_Field1”
-w “MyLayer.Join_ID = MyTable.Join_ID”
-u ****** –p ******

One thing that’s a little odd about this syntax is that the join information is given in the WHERE clause. In a typical SQL CREATE VIEW statement, the join information would be found in the FROM clause.

Also note that if you want the resulting view to be a virtual feature class that can be used with ArcGIS Desktop, you will need to include the OBJECTID and Shape fields from the original feature class in the list of columns to include.

For reference, the sample data in MyLayer and MyTable looks like so:

image

Notice that there is no record with a Join_ID of 5 in MyTable, and no record with a Join_ID of 7 in MyLayer.

Step 2: Modify the View Definition in SQL Server Management Studio

As was mentioned in the overview, the default behavior of “sdetable –o create_view” creates a view with an INNER JOIN. If we add the newly created view to ArcMap, only the 5 matching records are shown in the view:

image

To modify the view definition so that it uses an outer join, open SQL Server Management Studio and drill down to the Views folder under the sde database. Next, right click on the view you just created and choose Modify.

 image

Change the phrase “INNER JOIN” in the FROM clause to “LEFT OUTER JOIN” and save the changes.

image

Now if we look at the View in ArcMap again, we will see all records from MyLayer, with null values for any records with a Join_ID in MyLayer that was unmatched in MyTable:

image

You can use other join styles such as FULL OUTER JOIN, but keep in mind that if the primary OBJECTID (or Row ID) column contains multiple null values, client behavior will become unpredictable.

Wrap Up

When creating ArcSDE Spatial Views using the “sdetable –o create_view” command, the default join type is the most restrictive INNER JOIN. But you can change the view definition to use other join types using the ALTER VIEW SQL command or your database’s management tool. The article showed an example of how to make such a change with SQL Server Management Studio.

I hope you find this helpful!

Resources

 

Tags: ,

ArcSDE | How To | Planet GS

How To: Display an ArcGIS Server Cached Tile Layer as a Custom Map Type with the Google Maps API for Flash

by James Richards July 06, 2009

Overview

This is the third post in a series where I discuss techniques for interacting with the ArcGIS Server REST API from within a Flex 3 application built with the Google Maps API for Flash. The first and second posts presented and refined an example that demonstrated how to stream features from ArcGIS Server and overlay them on top of Google Maps data. This post demonstrates how to display an ArcGIS Server cached tile layer as a custom map type with the Google Maps API for Flash.

Sample Application Concepts

The sample application works as follows:

  • The Google Maps API for Flash is embedded in a Flex 3 application.
  • A cached tile layer representing Land Base features for Portland, Oregon is served via an ArcGIS Server Map Service, accessible via ArcGIS Server’s REST API.
  • The cached tile layer appears as a custom map type in the Google Maps API for Flash User Interface.
  • The cached tile layer is displayed at zoom levels 0 - 19.

Here are a couple of screen shots of the sample application. The first shows the application with the custom “Land Base” map type selected. The second shows the application with the normal map type selected.

image

image

Live example is here, and source code is here. [more]

Discussion

MXML File

Starting with a basic Flex Application, we have a single map with a specified “map ready” event:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<mx:Application xmlns:mx="http://www.adobe.com/2006/mxml"
    xmlns:gm="com.google.maps.*"
    backgroundGradientColors="[0xFFFFFF, 0xAAAAAA]"
    height="100%" width="100%" viewSourceURL="srcview/index.html">
    <gm:Map id="map"
        width="100%"
        height="100%"
        key="(Your API Key)"
        mapevent_mapready="map_mapReady(event)" />
    <mx:Script>
        // Omitted for clarity
    </mx:Script>
</mx:Application>

In the map_mapReady function we create an instance of the custom tile layer, specifying the URL endpoint of the cached tiles, the minimum and maximum zoom levels, and the copyright text. Then we create a new map type using the custom tile layer instance. Next we add the usual map controls, and finally we initialize the map using the new map type.

private function map_mapReady(event:Event):void {
    // Create custom tile layer
    var baseUrl:String = http://sampleserver1.arcgisonline.com/ +
        "ArcGIS/rest/services/Portland/ESRI_LandBase_WebMercator/MapServer";
    var copyright:String = "Taxlots, Zoning © Oregon METRO RLIS; " +
        "Buildings © City of Portland Planning"; 
    var tileLayer:TileLayer = new TileLayer(baseUrl, 0, 19, copyright);

    // Create custom map type and add to map
    var mapType:IMapType = new MapType([tileLayer], map.MERCATOR_PROJECTION, "Land Base");
    map.addMapType(mapType);

    // Add map controls
    var mtc:MapTypeControl = new MapTypeControl();
    map.addControl(mtc);
    var pc:PositionControl = new PositionControl();
    map.addControl(pc);
    var zc:ZoomControl = new ZoomControl();
    map.addControl(zc);
    var sc:ScaleControl = new ScaleControl();
    map.addControl(sc);
    var omc:OverviewMapControl = new OverviewMapControl();
    map.addControl(omc);

    // Initialize map. Use custom tile layer for the initial map type           
    map.setCenter(new LatLng(45.520211, -122.65553), 17, mapType);
}

The custom tile layer is implemented with the reusable TileLayer class and its companion Tile utility class. The basic design for these classes comes from Pamela Fox’s custom tile layer sample in the Google Maps API for Flash Demo Gallery.

The TileLayer constructor takes four arguments: the URL endpoint of the cached tiles, the minimum zoom level, the maximum zoom level, and the copyright text. Our example uses an ESRI sample server that has a Land Base cached tile service for Portland, Oregon. 

We determine the appropriate values for the constructor’s arguments by exploring the MapServer REST API using the interactive SDK . The MapServer is hosted at: http://sampleserver1.arcgisonline.com/arcgis/rest/services

image

By drilling down into the Portland Folder and the associated MapServices, we learn about the functionality and data layers that are available for consumption. If we drill down to the Portland/ESRI_LandBase_WebMercator MapServer, we can gather the information we need to fill in the above mentioned TileLayer constructor.

image

First, we need to check to make sure that the MapServer is cached. Look at the Single Fused Map Cache property and make sure it is set to true. Next, verify that the MapServer uses the Google Maps (and Virtual Earth) tiling scheme by making sure the Spatial Reference is set to 102113 (Web Mercator), the Width and Height are 256 pixels, and the DPI is 96.

If you are designing your own map cache to overlay on top of Google Maps, be sure to read the following information in the ESRI online documentation (depending on your platform):

To determine the base URL constructor argument, look at the URL in the browser’s address bar. The URL should end with “MapServer”.

image

To determine the minimum and maximum zoom levels, scroll down and look at the Tile Info - Levels of Detail section. The first Level ID in the list is the minimum zoom level (in this case 0) and the last Level ID is the maximum zoom level (in this case 19).

image

Finally, the copyright parameter can be anything you deem appropriate. In this case, I abbreviated the information found in the Copyright Text property of the MapServer.

TileLayer Class Implementation

Moving on to the TileLayer class implementation, here is the code:

// Custom tile layer for displaying ArcGIS Server cached tiles
// in a Google Maps API for Flash application.
public class TileLayer extends TileLayerBase
{
    private var baseUrl:String;
    private var minResolution:Number;
    private var maxResolution:Number;

    // Constructor
    public function TileLayer(baseUrl:String, minResolution:Number,
                          maxResolution:Number, copyright:String) {
        // Save the options
        this.baseUrl = baseUrl;
        this.minResolution = minResolution;
        this.maxResolution = maxResolution;

        // Add copyright information.
        var copyrightCollection:CopyrightCollection = new CopyrightCollection();
        copyrightCollection.addCopyright(new Copyright("TileLayer",
            new LatLngBounds(new LatLng(-180, 90), new LatLng(180, -90)),
            0, copyright));
        super(copyrightCollection);
    }

    // Return the coarsest zoom level. Provides information necessary
    // to adjust the boundaries of the zoom level control when this 
    // layer is included in a custom map type.
    public override function getMinResolution():Number {
        return minResolution;
    }

    // Return the finest zoom level. Provides information necessary to
    // adjust the boundaries of the zoom level control when this layer
    // is included in a custom map type.
    public override function getMaxResolution():Number {
        return maxResolution;
    }

    // Creates and loads a tile (x, y) at the given zoom level.
    public override function loadTile(tilePos:Point, zoom:Number):DisplayObject {
        return new Tile(baseUrl, tilePos, zoom);
    }       
}

As you can see, the class is pretty simple. It extends the Google Maps API’s TileLayerBase abstract base class, which does most of the work. According to the Google Maps API for Flash Documentation, sub-classes must override the loadTile() method; however, overriding the other methods is optional. The loadTile() method must return a DisplayObject that represents the tile.

Tile Class Implementation

In the loadTile() method implementation, we defer to the Tile utility class, which is defined as follows:

// Custom tile for displaying ArcGIS Server cached tiles
// in a Google Maps API for Flash application.
public class Tile extends Sprite
{
    // Constructor
    public function Tile(baseUrl:String, tilePos: Point, zoom:Number)
    {
        // Construct the url to the ArcGIS Server tile:
        // http://<path to map service>/tile/<zoom level>/<y>/<x>
        var tileUrl:String = baseUrl + "/tile/" + zoom.toString() + "/" +
            tilePos.y.toString() + "/" + tilePos.x.toString();
        trace(tileUrl);

        // Load the tile and add it to the sprite as a child
        var loader:Loader = new Loader();
        loader.contentLoaderInfo.addEventListener(IOErrorEvent.IO_ERROR, ioErrorHandler);
        loader.load(new URLRequest(tileUrl));
        addChild(loader);
    }

    // Error handler when a tile cannot be loaded by the loader.
    public function ioErrorHandler(event:IOErrorEvent):void {
        // If the tile was not found, just load an empty sprite
        // so nothing draws.
        addChild(new Sprite());
    }
}

The Tile class extends Sprite, which in turn inherits from DisplayObject. Therefore, we can return an instance of the Tile class from the loadTile() method in the TileLayer class. The Tile class’s constructor builds a URL to the tile as served by the ArcGIS Server REST API. The URL pattern for accessing tiles through the REST API is: http://<path to map service>/tile/<zoom level>/<y>/<x>

Once the URL string is created, a flash Loader is used in concert with a URLRequest object to load the tile image and add it as a child to the Sprite. If the tile is not found and an error is thrown, we simply add an empty Sprite instead so nothing draws. Alternatively, we could load some kind of "tile not found" graphic, as shown by Pamela Fox’s custom tile layer sample in the Google Maps API for Flash Demo Gallery.

Wrap Up

This post has demonstrated how to display an ArcGIS Server cached tile layer as a custom map type with the Google Maps API for Flash. The TileLayer and Tile classes are reusable. To add an ArcGIS Server cached tile layer to your project, simply copy the classes as-is and modify the code shown in the map_mapReady event to use your cached MapServer.

Live example is here, and source code is here.

Resources

Downloads
Documentation and Sample Servers
Blogs, Forums and Code Galleries

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ArcGIS Server | Flex 3 | Google Maps | How To | Planet GS | REST

ArcGIS Server WebADF: Adjusting the Zoom Scale for Find Address Task Results

by James Richards July 02, 2009

Overview

When working with the Find Address Task in the ArcGIS Server WebADF, the default zoom scale that is displayed when the user zooms to a found address might not be what you want. This article discusses how to change it using the ZoomToPointFactor property. [more]

Background

Let’s assume that you have a WebADF application with some Map Layers and a Find Address Task that is configured to use a Geocoding Service. This could be an application that you created from scratch in Visual Studio, or one that you created with ArcGIS Server Manager.

After entering an address:

image

The results are shown in the Task Results panel. From there you can right click on an address and choose Zoom To:

image

This will zoom the map to an area centered on the address point. The problem is that scale to which the map is zoomed might not be what you want. Often it’s zoomed out too far.

Solution

To adjust the zoom scale to your liking, add the ZoomToPointFactor property to the esri:TaskResults element on the ASP.NET Page hosting the application.

If you created the application with ArcGIS Server Manager using the default options, this would be found in the Default.aspx file in the C:\inetpub\wwwroot\[YourApplicationName] directory.

Open this file and search for the esri:TaskResults tag, then add the ZoomToPointFactor property and give it a numeric value. In the example below, I’ve set the property to “1000”.

image ArcGIS Server will divide the width and height of the map by this value when zooming to a point. For this example, the zoom area will be 1/1000th of the full extent. The larger the ZoomToPointFactor, the further in that the map will zoom. You will need to experiment to find the ratio that works best, as the full extent can vary greatly depending on the data in your application.

Also note that if you have any cached map services in your application, ArcGIS Server will snap to the cache scale that is closest to the calculated map extent. Consequently, you might not see the map extent change if you don’t modify the ZoomToPointFactor property by a large enough value to jump to another scale.

Resources

Tags: , , ,

.NET | ArcGIS Server | How To | Planet GS | WebADF

Google Maps API for Flash and ArcGIS Server REST API Integration – Part 2

by James Richards June 15, 2009

Overview

This is the second post in a series where I discuss techniques for interacting with the ArcGIS Server REST API from within a Flex 3 application built with the Google Maps API for Flash. If you haven’t read the first post yet, I encourage you to do so now.

The first post presented a simple example that demonstrated how to stream features from ArcGIS Server and overlay them on top of Google Maps data. In this second post, we will reorganize the code for better reusability and add some geocoding functionality.

image

I’ll keep this post pretty brief and only cover the major points. Feel free to check out the live example and dive into the source code! [more]

Reorganizing the Code

In the previous post all code was presented in-line in a single mxml file. While this helped illustrate the concepts simply and succinctly, the code was not really reusable other than by the old copy/paste method. In this updated example, all of the feature streaming and drawing code has been placed in its own PolygonOverlay class.

This new class has a number of advantages over the old one. Many of the hard coded values, such as minimum and maximum zoom levels, the tool tip field and symbolization options are now encapsulated in the class definition.

The PolygonOverlay class’s constructor takes a number of these options, making it more flexible. For example:

polygonOverlay = new PolygonOverlay(map, // Google Map
    parcelsUrl,         // Root url of layer in ArcGIS Server REST API
    17,                    // Minimum Zoom Level
    21,                   // Maximum Zoom Level
    "RNO",              // Tool tip field
    transparentFill,  // Default fill style
    greyStroke);     // Default line style

In the previous post, all graphics on the map were erased each time the polygons needed to be redrawn. This is a problem if there are other graphics on the map. Now that we have added geocoding functionality to the sample application, we will draw the geocode results as a marker on the map along with an info window. We don't want these graphics to be erased when the user pans or zooms and the parcel polygons are redrawn.

The new PolygonOverlay class handles this by keeping track of all the Google Polygon objects that it draws on the map. When it needs to redraw the polygons, only the previous polygons are removed from the map, while the other graphics are left on the map. Check out the PolygonOverlay.as class for more details.

Adding Geocode Functionality

The new sample application also adds geocoding using the ClientGeocoder class. The findAddress function sets up the client geocoder and dispatches the request:

private function findAddress():void {
    trace("findAddress() - entered");
    var address:String = addressText.text;
    trace("findAddress() - address: " + address);

    // Constrain geocoder to a viewport that is in/around Portland, Oregon
    var sw:LatLng = new LatLng(-122.76728, 45.45137);
    var ne:LatLng = new LatLng(-122.53211, 45.59233);
    var viewport:LatLngBounds = new LatLngBounds(sw, ne);
    var options:ClientGeocoderOptions = new ClientGeocoderOptions();
    options.viewport = viewport;

    // Setup client geocoder and dispatch request
    var geocoder:ClientGeocoder = new ClientGeocoder();
    geocoder.setOptions(options);
    geocoder.addEventListener(GeocodingEvent.GEOCODING_SUCCESS, geocoder_GeocodingSuccess);
    geocoder.addEventListener(GeocodingEvent.GEOCODING_FAILURE, geocoder_GeocodingFailure);
    geocoder.geocode(address);
}

One interesting thing that’s happening here is that we’re constraining the geocode request to a viewport that is in/around the Portland, Oregon area. Google’s geocoding service will attempt to find the best match in that area.

I don’t know much about Portland (I’ve never been there) but I do know that it’s home to a number of microbreweries as well as the historic Burnside Skate Park. Try entering these addresses and place names:

  • 206 SW Morrison St (Location of the Rock Bottom Brewery)
  • Burnside Skate Park

One of the interesting things about using the Geocoding Service with a viewport is that many place names get resolved to actual locations without having to go through a confirmation step. This won’t work everywhere for every place name, but it helps narrow things down a bit so Google’s Geocoding Service can work its magic.

Wrap Up

That’s all the detail I’ll cover in the post, but be sure to check out the source code for more goodies like how to add the address marker and pop up an info window.

Stay tuned for future posts, where we will continue to add functionality and improve upon the code.

Live example is here, and source code is here.

Resources

Downloads
Documentation and Sample Servers
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ArcGIS Server | Flex 3 | Google Maps | How To | Planet GS

Google Maps API for Flash and ArcGIS Server REST API Integration – Part 1

by James Richards May 12, 2009

Overview

This is the first post in a series where I will discuss techniques for interacting with the ArcGIS Server REST API from within a Flex 3 application built with the Google Maps API for Flash.

With this post, we start with a simple example that demonstrates how to stream features from ArcGIS Server and overlay them on top of Google Maps data. In this case, we will be working with parcel data.

This first example serves to demonstrate the basic concepts as succinctly as possible. In future posts, I will gradually refactor and improve upon the code to create reusable components. [more]

Background

You may be asking yourself “ESRI has a Flex API, why aren’t we using that?” Yes, ESRI does have an excellent Flex API - but it lacks the ability to show Google Maps data or use the Google Geocode API.

This is probably more of a Google licensing issue than anything else. But as of today, if you want to display your own ArcGIS Server content on top of Google Maps data in a Flex/Flash project, you can’t use the ESRI Flex API to do it without violating the Google Maps Terms of Service.

If Google were to open up its TOS to allow direct access to the map tiles (as many have called for) that would solve part of the problem. But you would still have the issue of being restricted in what you can do with the results of a call to the Geocode API. My understanding is that you are only allowed to display the result(s) on a Google Map, not in any other mapping system.

In my experience, the Google Maps data and Geocode functions are superior to the ArcGIS Online equivalents that are accessible from the ESRI Flex API. If you want to take advantage of Google’s map content and Geocode functionality, it’s worth the effort to integrate the ArcGIS Server REST API with the Google Maps API for Flash .

Don’t take this to mean I don’t like ESRI’s Flex API – it has many strengths which I’ll cover in future posts. In the meantime, if you’re going that route, check out Thunderhead Explorer - an excellent blog by ESRI’s Mansour Raad featuring “Tips and Tricks with ArcGIS Flex Mapping API”.

Sample Application Concepts

Our simple sample application works as follows:

  • The Google Maps API for Flash is embedded in a Flex 3 application.
  • The parcels are served via an ArcGIS Server Map Service, accessible via ArcGIS Server’s REST API.
  • The parcels are displayed at zoom levels 17 - 19.
  • The parcels are fetched via an HTTPService each time the map extent changes.
  • The parcels are returned in JSON format.
  • The JSON response is decoded using the open source JSON decoder in as3corelib.
  • Each parcel’s geometry is converted to a Polygon Overlay and added to the map.
  • Parcels are drawn with dark grey lines when the normal map is selected and white lines when the Satellite or Hybrid map is selected.
  • When the user hovers the mouse over a parcel, it’s parcel number is displayed in a tooltip.

Here are a couple of screenshots:

image

image

Live example is here, and source code is here.

Discussion

Starting with a basic Flex Application, we have a single map with a specified “map ready” event:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<mx:Application
    xmlns:mx="http://www.adobe.com/2006/mxml"
    xmlns:gm="com.google.maps.*"
    backgroundGradientColors="[0xFFFFFF, 0xAAAAAA]"
    height="100%" width="100%" >
    <gm:Map id="map"
        width="100%"
        height="100%"
        key="(Your API Key Here)"
        mapevent_mapready="map_mapReady(event)" />

    <mx:Script>
        // Omitted for clarity
    </mx:Script>
</mx:Application>

Next, we declare a few member variables at the top of the script block:

// Parcels URL and parameters
private var parcelsUrl:String = "http://sampleserver1.arcgisonline.com/" +
    "ArcGIS/rest/services/Portland/ESRI_LandBase_WebMercator/MapServer/1/query";
private var wgs84wkid:String = "4236";
private var toolTipField:String = "RNO";

// Parcels map service
private var parcelsService:HTTPService = new HTTPService();

// Parcels symbols
private var transparentFill:FillStyle;
private var greyStroke:StrokeStyle;
private var whiteStroke:StrokeStyle;

With the parcelsUrl variable, we are specifying an endpoint to an ArcGIS Server REST API query function on a Layer in a MapService. See the ESRI ArcGIS Server REST API Reference for more information on the specific URL format for calling this operation.

For this example, we have chosen an ESRI sample server that has a parcels layer available for Portland, Oregon. We can explore this MapService and other sample services using the interactive SDK located at the following URL: http://sampleserver1.arcgisonline.com/arcgis/rest/services

image 

By drilling down into the Portland Folder and MapServices, we can learn about the functionality and data layers that are available for consumption. If we drill down to the layer in question, we can see a few interesting things about it, including the field names and aliases.

We also see that the layer has a spatial reference well known id (wkid) of 102113 – also known as Web Mercator. This is great if you need to overlay the layer as map tiles on Google Maps, because Google’s map tiles are also in Web Mercator. However, streamed geometries with coordinates in the Web Mercator spatial reference will not overlay properly on top of Google Maps. They must be in WGS 84 (Lat/Lon).

Therefore, we have a wgs84wkid variable which holds the well known id for WGS 84. As you will see, the ArcGIS Server REST API allows us to specify input and output spatial references that are different from the spatial reference of the MapService – and it will perform the coordinate conversions on fly.

The map_mapReady function is filled in next:

private function map_mapReady(event:Event):void {
    // Setup parcel symbols
    transparentFill = new FillStyle({
        alpha: 0.0 });
    greyStroke = new StrokeStyle({
        alpha: 1.0,
        thickness: 1.5,
        color: 0x333333 });
    whiteStroke = new StrokeStyle({
        alpha: 1.0,
        thickness: 1.5,
        color: 0xffffff });
   
    // Add map controls
    var mtc:MapTypeControl = new MapTypeControl();
    map.addControl(mtc);
    var pc:PositionControl = new PositionControl();
    map.addControl(pc);
    var zc:ZoomControl = new ZoomControl();
    map.addControl(zc);
    var sc:ScaleControl = new ScaleControl();
    map.addControl(sc);
    var omc:OverviewMapControl = new OverviewMapControl();
    map.addControl(omc);

    // Add event listeners
    map.addEventListener(MapMoveEvent.MOVE_END, map_moveEnd);

    // Initialize map           
    map.setCenter(new LatLng(45.520211, -122.65553), 17,
        MapType.NORMAL_MAP_TYPE);
}

In the map_mapReady function, we setup a transparent fill style and stroke styles for the dark grey and white lines. We also initialize the map controls and add an event listener for the map’s “move end” event. This event is where we will call the ArcGIS Server REST API to get the parcels for the current map extent. Finally, we center the map and zoom in on an area of Portland so that we’ll have something to look at when the application starts.

The map’s “move end” event is where we send an http request to ArcGIS Server to get the parcels:

private function map_moveEnd(event:MapMoveEvent):void {
    // Get zoom level
    var zoom:Number = map.getZoom();
    trace("map_moveEnd - Zoom level: " + zoom.toString());

    // Only draw parcels if zoomed in far enough
    if (zoom < 17) {
        // This just clears the overlays if we're not zoomed in far enough.
        // This would be a problem if there are other overlays besides parcels.
        // We'll deal with that in a future post.
        map.clearOverlays();
        return;
    }

    // Get current extent
    var bnds:LatLngBounds = map.getLatLngBounds();
   
    // An ESRI envelope is configured as xmin, ymin, xmax, ymax
    var envelope:String = bnds.getWest().toString() + "," +
                          bnds.getSouth().toString() + "," +
                          bnds.getEast().toString() + "," +
                          bnds.getNorth().toString();
    trace("map_moveEnd - Envelope: " + envelope);
   
    // Cancel http service in case a request was sent
    // that hasn't come back yet
    parcelsService.cancel();

    // Setup http service and add listeners
    parcelsService.url = parcelsUrl;
    parcelsService.addEventListener(ResultEvent.RESULT, onParcelResult);
    parcelsService.addEventListener(FaultEvent.FAULT, onHttpFault);

    // Setup parameters to pass to the service
    var params:Object = new Object();
    params.geometry = envelope;
    params.geometryType = "esriGeometryEnvelope";
    params.inSR = wgs84wkid;
    params.spatialRel = "esriSpatialRelIntersects";
    params.returnGeometry = "true";
    params.outSR = wgs84wkid;
    params.outFields = toolTipField;
    params.f = "json";

    // Send the request
    parcelsService.send(params);
}

First, we get the current zoom level. If the level is less than 17, we clear all overlays and exit. This is a shortcut to keep the example simple. If we were drawing any other overlays besides parcels, this would obviously be a problem. We’ll look at a better way to handle clearing the parcels in a future post.

Next, we get the LatLngBounds of the map and convert it into a string representation of an ESRI envelope that can be passed to the ArcGIS Server REST API.

Before making a new request through the HTTPService, we cancel it in case a prior request was sent that hasn’t come back yet.

Next we assign the URL endpoint to the HTTP Service and set up the event listeners.

In Flex 3 (like in Javascript), you can create an anonymous object and add properties to it “on the fly”. Here we create a new Object named params and add all of the parameters we want to pass as arguments in the URL query string. See the ESRI ArcGIS Server REST API Reference for more information on what parameters are available when calling the query operation on a layer.

Once the params Object is constructed, it is passed to the send method on the parcelsService (HTTPService). The HTTPService converts each property into a query string argument before sending the request to the REST API for the MapService.

The “on parcel result” event will be fired by the HTTPService when a response is received.

private function onParcelResult(event:ResultEvent):void {
    //trace(event.result as String);

    // Use ascorelib JSON serializer to decode returned object
    var obj:Object = JSON.decode(event.result as String);
    if (obj.error != null) {
        Alert.show('An error occured on the server. The response message returned was:\n\n' +
            event.result, 'Server Error');
        return;
    }

    // Simply clear all the polygons from the map.
    // This would be a problem if there are other overlays.
    // We'll deal with that in a future post.
    map.clearOverlays();

    // Get the features array from the returned JSON
    var features:Array = obj.features as Array;

    // This code breaks multipolygons into a separate polygon for each
    // ring. Not ideal, but necessary at this zoom level because the only
    // way to create multi ringed polygons in GMaps Flash API (as of v 1.9c)
    // is with the Polyline Encoding Algorithm - and this algorithm rounds
    // to 5 decimal places - thus creating choppy looking polygons.
    // We'll discuss this further in a future post.
    for each (var feature:Object in features) {
        for each (var ring:Array in feature.geometry.rings) {
            var points:Array = new Array();
            for each (var point:Array in ring) {
                points.push(new LatLng(point[1], point[0]));
            }

            var polyOpts:PolygonOptions = new PolygonOptions();
            polyOpts.fillStyle = transparentFill;
            polyOpts.strokeStyle =
                (map.getCurrentMapType() == MapType.NORMAL_MAP_TYPE ?
                greyStroke : whiteStroke);
            polyOpts.tooltip = feature.attributes[toolTipField];

            var poly:Polygon = new Polygon(points, polyOpts);
            map.addOverlay(poly);
        }
    }               
}

The ResultEvent’s result property contains the JSON string returned from the server. We use the ascorelib JSON serializer to decode the returned string into an Object. From there, we can access the properties of the result object defined for the ArcGIS Server response.

The JSON Response Syntax is defined as follows:

{
"displayFieldName" : "<displayFieldName>",
"fieldAliases" : {
    "<fieldName1>" : "<fieldAlias1>",
    "<fieldName2>" : "<fieldAlias2>"
},
"geometryType" : "<geometryType>",
"spatialReference" : {<spatialReference>},
"features" : [
    {
    "attributes" : {
        "<fieldName1>" : <fieldValue11>,
        "<fieldName2>" : <fieldValue21>
    },
    "geometry" : {<geometry1>}
    },
    {
    "attributes" : {
        "<fieldName1>" : <fieldValue12>,
        "<fieldName2>" : <fieldValue22>
    },
    "geometry" : {<geometry2>}
    }
]
}

In this case, since we are requesting polygons, the JSON Response Syntax for the geometries is defined as follows:

{
"rings" : [
    [ [<x11>, <y11>], [<x12>, <y12>], ..., [<x11>, <y11>] ],
    [ [<x21>, <y21>], [<x22>, <y22>], ..., [<x21>, <y21>] ]
],
"spatialReference" : {<spatialReference>}
}

Once we get the features array from the Object we iterate each feature, get its attributes and geometry, construct a Google Maps Polygon Overlay, and add it to the map.

When constructing the Polygon, a PolygonOptions object is created to define its look and behavior. We use this object to define the symbology, choosing dark grey lines if the map type is Normal, and white lines if the map type is one of the others such as Satellite or Hybrid. The PolygonOptions object is also used to define the tool tip that will be displayed when the user hovers the mouse over the Polygon.

Note that if the ESRI polygon has multiple rings, we simply create a separate Google Polygon for each ring. This is necessary because the Google Polygon constructor can only take one array of points and does not handle multiple rings.

There is a way to create multi-ringed Google Polygons using the Polygon.fromEncoded() static method, but this turns out to be problematic due to the rounding errors introduced by the encoding algorithm.

Default 500 Feature Limit

ArcGIS Server MapServices have a default limit of 500 features that can be returned from a layer query request. If you Pan/Zoom around the live example application, you might notice missing parcels if you are in a dense area and the limit is reached. The limit can be changed by modifying the MaxRecordCount in the MapService’s configuration file on the server. But since we’re using an ESRI sample server, I can’t very well make that change.

Wrap Up

This simple application has served to demonstrate the basics of communicating with the ArcGIS Server REST API and overlaying the results on a Google Map built with the Google Maps API for Flash.

Stay tuned for future posts, where we will refactor and improve upon the code to create reusable components.

Live example is here, and source code is here.

Resources

Downloads

Documentation and Sample Servers

Blogs and Forums

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ArcGIS Server | Flex 3 | Google Maps | How To | Planet GS

Reduce ArcGIS Server Boilerplate Code By Implementing IDisposable

by James Richards April 19, 2009

When programming with ArcObjects and ArcGIS Server, code often follows a common pattern of connecting to ArcGIS Server, getting hold of an IServerContext, doing some work, and releasing the context. This leads to a lot of unnecessarily repeated setup and teardown code, usually taking a form similar to the following example:

IServerContext context = null;

try

{

    IGISServerConnection conn = new GISServerConnectionClass()

        as IGISServerConnection;

 

    // Connect as ASPNET or NETWORK SERVICE.

    // Get optional host setting from web.config,

    // or use localhost if not found.

    string host = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["AGSHost"];

    if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(host))

    {

        host = "localhost";

    }

 

    // Make connection

    conn.Connect(host);

    IServerObjectManager som = conn.ServerObjectManager;

    context = som.CreateServerContext("MyServer", "MapServer");

   

    // Do some stuff with the server context

}

finally

{

    if (context != null)

    {

        context.ReleaseContext();

    }

}

In this example, there is a lot of boilerplate happening just to get to the server context and do something interesting. Seeing this kind of code repeated throughout an ArcGIS Server project made me a little queasy as it violates the DRY Principle, so that got me thinking about how to eliminate it. [more]

I decided to create a wrapper class that handles making the connection and implements IServerContext and IDisposable. Inspiration for this idea comes from the .NET SqlConnection class, which also implements IDisposable and can therefore be instantiated inside of a using block to automatically close the connection and release any resources when the using block goes out of scope. (See this David Hayden post for a basic discussion of why this is a good thing.) Proper implementation of IDisposable is known as the Dispose Pattern and is documented both here and in Cwalina and Adams excellent Framework Design Guidelines.

With this new class, we can reduce the boilerplate code block to the following:

using (ArcGisServerContext context = new ArcGisServerContext("MyServer",

    ArcGisServiceType.MapServer))

{

    // Do some stuff with the server context

}

Notice also the use of an Enum to indicate the server type, thus eliminating one of the error prone hard coded strings as well. (In a real application, I would also retrieve the value “MyServer” from a config or resource file.) The Enum is defined like so:

public enum ArcGisServiceType

{

    MapServer,

    GeocodeServer,

    GlobeServer,

    GPServer,

    GeoDataServer,

    GeometryServer,

    ImageServer,

}

and the ArcGISServerContext class is implemented as follows:

using System;

using System.Configuration;

using ESRI.ArcGIS.Server;

public class ArcGisServerContext : IServerContext, IDisposable

{

    #region Fields

    private IServerContext serverContext;

    #endregion

 

    #region Constructors()

    // Here you can add overloaded constructors to take additional

    // arguments such as login credentials - Or you could alter the

    // constructor to use an ArcGIS Server Identity from web.config.

 

    // This example just connects as the current user, which will be

    // ASPNET or NETWORK SERVICE if running under IIS on Wind XP or 2003.

    public ArcGisServerContext(string serviceName,

        ArcGisServiceType serviceType)

    {

        IGISServerConnection conn = new GISServerConnectionClass()

            as IGISServerConnection;

 

        // Get optional host setting from web.config,

        // or use localhost if not found.

        string host = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings["AGSHost"];

        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(host))

        {

            host = "localhost";

        }

 

        // Make connection and cache IServerContext

        conn.Connect(host);

        IServerObjectManager som = conn.ServerObjectManager;

        serverContext = som.CreateServerContext(serviceName,

            serviceType.ToString());

    }

    #endregion

 

    #region IServerContext Implementation

    // These methods just pass through to the cached server context

 

    public object CreateObject(string clsid)

    {

        return serverContext.CreateObject(clsid);

    }

 

    public object GetObject(string name)

    {

        return serverContext.GetObject(name);

    }

 

    public object LoadObject(string str)

    {

        return serverContext.LoadObject(str);

    }

 

    public void ReleaseContext()

    {

        serverContext.ReleaseContext();

    }

 

    public void Remove(string name)

    {

        serverContext.Remove(name);

    }

 

    public void RemoveAll()

    {

        serverContext.RemoveAll();

    }

 

    public string SaveObject(object obj)

    {

        return serverContext.SaveObject(obj);

    }

 

    public IServerObject ServerObject

    {

        get { return serverContext.ServerObject; }

    }

 

    public void SetObject(string name, object obj)

    {

        serverContext.SetObject(name, obj);

    }

    #endregion

 

    #region IDisposable Implementation

    // Implementation of the Dispose Pattern

 

    public void Dispose()

    {

        Dispose(true);

        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);

    }

 

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)

    {

        // Release the server context

        if (disposing)

        {

            if (serverContext != null)

            {

                serverContext.ReleaseContext();

            }

        }

    }

    #endregion

}

 

It’s really pretty simple, and it sure is nice not to have to copy / paste or keep re-typing the same boilerplate code over and over.

Hope this helps!

Tags: , , ,

.NET | ArcGIS Server | Planet GS

A Simple Daily Backup Strategy for Subversion Using 7-zip and Dropbox

by James Richards February 17, 2009

Background

I’m using Subversion (via VisualSVN Server) for source control. I recently decided to add daily offsite backup to my setup. This was relatively easy to accomplish with 7-zip, Dropbox, and a batch file.

VisualSVN Server is a free package that makes setting up and managing Subversion on Windows really easy. It includes Subversion, an Apache web server, and a GUI management console.

Dropbox is an easy to use online file storage and synchronization service. It’s free for accounts up to 2GB.

7-zip is a free, open source zip library that can be controlled from the command line. [more]

Setup

First I signed up for a Dropbox account, and downloaded and installed their synchronization software. After setup, I opted to move the “My Dropbox” folder to C:\Dropbox so it wouldn’t be located in my user profile directory. This was easy to do – I just selected Preferences… from the Dropbox system tray icon, clicked the Move… button, and specified the new directory.

Next I downloaded and installed 7-zip. Pretty self explanatory.

After all the components were installed, I made sure that the locations of the svnadmin and 7-zip utilities were added to the PATH environment variable. Right-click on My Computer, and choose Properties… Then click the Advanced tab and the Environment Variables button. Under the System Variables list, scroll to find the Path variable, select it and click Edit. On my system, I added the follow two entries to the end of the Path variable: “C:\Program Files\VisualSVN Server\bin\;C:\Program Files\7-Zip\;” (no quotes). When finished click OK 3 times.

Batch File

Now that all the pieces are in place, here’s a simple batch file that exports a repository to a temporary folder, zips it up, copies the zip file to the Dropbox folder and cleans up after itself. The script is called svnbackup.bat and takes a single argument, which is the name of the Repository to backup.

mkdir C:\Temp\%1
svnadmin hotcopy D:\Repositories\%1 D:\Temp\%1
7z a C:\Temp\%1.zip D:\Temp\%1*
copy C:\Temp\%1.zip "C:\Dropbox\My Dropbox\Repositories\%1.zip"
del C:\Temp\%1.zip
attrib -r C:\Temp\%1\format
attrib -r C:\Temp\%1\db\format
del /q /s C:\Temp\%1\*.*
rd /q /s C:\Temp\%1

Once the zip file is dropped in the Dropbox folder, synchronization automatically kicks in and the zip file is backup up to the Dropbox servers.

Notes

A couple of things to note. On my system, Subversion is set up to keep all repositories in the D:\Repositories directory. Also, I realize I could have made a variable for the temp directory, but I was being lazy. Finally, when deleting the temporary directory, I was trying to figure out how to tell attrib to recursively walk the subdirectories to clear all of the read only flags, but I couldn’t get it to work. Since there were only two read only files in the tree, I opted to punt and make two calls.

Automation

The final step to this solution is to automate the backup of all repositories on a daily basis. I created a second script which calls the svnbackup script with the name of each repository. It’s called svnbackup_all.bat, and here’s an example of what would go in there.

call C:\Scripts\svnbackup MyRepository
call C:\Scripts\svnbackup My2ndRepository

Once this script was in place I added a Scheduled Task to run it every night – while I’m sleeping more soundly with the knowledge that my source code will not be lost in the event of a major disaster.

Resources

VisualSVN Server
7-zip
Dropbox
Chad Myers DevEx article on Repeatability which includes a nice overview of VisualSVN Server
Google Search: 7-zip command line

Tags: , , , ,

7-zip | Dropbox | How To | VisualSVN

How To Use URL Rewriting for Extensionless WCF Svc Services with Helicon Tech ISAPI Rewrite

by James Richards February 02, 2009

Recently I was working on a WCF Service and wanted to serve it up with extensionless URLs. I downloaded and installed ISAPI Rewrite (Lite version) but struggled to come up with the correct regex expression to get it working.

I found many good blog postings and clues from Scott Gu, Scott Hanselman, and Jeff Atwood, and a thread on Stack Overflow, but none of these answered this specific question. As Scott Hanselman noted, URL rewriting can seem like "freaking voodoo".

So I moseyed on over to the Helicon Tech support forum and [more] asked the question. Anton (who I assume is one of the good folks at Helicon Tech) swiftly and correctly answered the question with the following example:

RewriteBase /
RewriteRule ^MyProject/MyService/products(.*)?$ MyProject/MyService.svc/products$1 [NC,L]

You can follow the complete thread here.

I hope this helps!

Tags: , , , , ,

.NET | ASP.NET | How To | REST | WCF

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Welcome

James Richards

Hi, I'm James Richards the CTO and co-founder of Artisan Global LLC. We make location-aware mobile apps with maps. I'm the author of QuakeFeed and I helped launch Zaarly at LASW Feb 2011. I also enjoy surfing, snowboarding, golfing, yoga, and music. I love my family: Linda, Sequoya and our cats Remy and Twiggy. Thanks for stopping by, I hope you find something helpful here.

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